Moma Rock When She Was Just A Nugget

I have joined a fantastic group of ladies, who are involved in a weekly blog project. Every Thursday, we will dazzle you with our insight on various topics. And each week, we take turns coming up with the idea for the blog topic. Please check out their blogs as well, listed under my Blogroll section. Just click on:

Froggie (Tracey): One frog’s distinct voice on the world around her.

Merry Land Girl (Melissa): Tales of a suburban mom who likes to talk about pop culture, books, Judaism, family, friendship and anything else that comes to mind.

Mom Of Many (Susanna): One Mom’s perspective on life, raising kids, knitting and other unrelated topics.

This week, Melissa chose to take the four of us back in time, to reconnect with who we were as kids: Tell us what you were like as a little kid: quirks, fears, interests, hobbies, passions, etc.

I’m the oldest of five, so my personality reflected that. I would always dote on my siblings, my little sister especially. For a while, it seemed I was the only one who understood her verbally. “Sara, what did your sister say?” Sort of like I was her translator.

I was a very spirited child, a little spark plug. I would do insane things like jump out of apartment windows (https://momarock.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/i-jumped-out-of-a-window-once/) or fly into fits of rage if someone angered me or hurt my feelings. I had a hard time with being told what to do, or not being allowed to do what I wanted to do when I wanted to do it (hence my jumping out of the window). I always felt as though I was an adult trapped inside a child’s body.

When I’d visit my grandparents, the first thing I’d ask for is her camera. I’d start to pose, and ask to have my picture taken. I’d also act out various scenes from movies or television shows. My mother’s favorite soap operas were the best! I’d stand in front of a long length mirror and pretend I was whatever character happened to be on at that moment. I was a ham.

 

I remember at times being quite shy, and hiding out so I didn’t have to meet new people. This was during my very early years. Once I was in school, I seemed to lack the embarrassment gene. I had no fear when it came to doing my own thing or being who I wanted to be.

I was a HUGE tomboy. I thank my dad for that. He raised me to enjoy the great outdoors, and appreciate camping, fishing, and exploring. I can recall biking a few miles from my home to a memorial park in order to catch salamanders and keep them as pets. That was the way I kept busy when I wasn’t in school.

When I wasn’t out catching pets, I’d read books and write stories. I could sit for hours making up some fantasy to put down on paper, or submerge myself into a good book. It’s interesting how even now, those two things help to relax me and comfort me. It’s my outlet.

When I was little, I wanted to be an actress. A writer. A teacher. A dancer or performer of some sort. My visions for the future seemed to change in the blink of an eye, as I figure most kids’ visions do. I was always optimistic though for what the future had in store for me, even when my childhood wasn’t so wonderful. I remember writing about the kind of mom I would be when I had my two kids (a boy and girl, named Michael and Michelle). I can also recall having grandiose ideas about becoming a well known author.

Guess I’m not too far off from my childhood persona, and my wishes and dreams.

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Moma Rock When She Was Just A Nugget”

  1. I really enjoyed reading this. It gave me a lot of insight to your personality. I’m sure you would have been fun to hang out with if we knew each other as kids. We could have made up stories and acted out soap operas together. 🙂

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